Day 6
June 11
 Monday Afternoon ...
TOLEDO





Rio Tajo
The source of the Tagus is the Fuente de García, in the Frías de Albarracín municipal term, Montes Universales, Sistema Ibérico, Sierra de Albarracín Comarca.
All its major tributaries enter the Tagus from the right (north) bank.
 The main cities it passes through are Aranjuez, Toledo, Talavera de la Reina and Alcántara in Spain, and Abrantes, Santarém, Almada and Lisbon in Portugal.

(Wikipedia)


Souvenir shop before arriving at downtown Toledo.




Cathedral of Toledo









Church of Santo Tomé

The Iglesia de Santo Tomé is a church located in the historical center of the city of Toledo (Spain), and was founded after the reconquest of this city by King Alfonso VI of León.[1] It appears quoted in the 12th century, as constructed on the site of an old mosque of the 11th century.[2] This mosque, together with other mosques in the city, were used as Christian churches without major changes, since in the taking of the city there was no destruction of buildings.
However, at the beginning of the 14th century, being in a ruinous state was totally rebuilt in charge of Gonzalo Ruiz de Toledo, Lord of Orgaz and the old minaret of the mosque was transformed into a bell tower in Mudéjar style.[3] Its fame is mainly due to the fact that it contains the painting The Burial of the Count of Orgaz by El Greco,
which can be seen by accessing the back of church.
(Wikipedia)



El Grecl's "Burial of the Count of Orgaz"
 Wikipedia Picture 





The Synagogue of Santa María la Blanca (literally Synagogue of Saint Mary the White, originally known as the Ibn Shushan Synagogue, or commonly the Congregational Synagogue of Toledo) is a museum and former synagogue in Toledo, Spain. Erected in 1180, according to an inscription on a beam, it is disputably considered the oldest synagogue building in Europe still standing.
It is now owned and preserved by the Catholic Church.
Its stylistic and cultural classification is unique among surviving buildings as it was constructed under the Christian Kingdom of Castile by Islamic architects for Jewish use. It is considered a symbol of the cooperation that existed among the three cultures that populated the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages.
(Wikipedia)









 

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